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I’m Niki, the founder and designer of Enji Studio Jewelry. We’re a sustainable luxury jewelry brand based in beautiful north county San Diego.

at Enji we’re on a mission to bring you meaningful, modern, ethical design that shows off your style, honors the journey of your life, and reflects your values. We craft each piece for you in our Carlsbad studio bringing new life to recycled gold and silver and using only FairTrade and ethically sourced diamonds and gemstones.

Enji was founded in 2014. We take steps toward positive change in our industry by practicing ethical sourcing and manufacturing and giving back to the local and global community. We create our pieces for everyday wear.

Enji is about modern, minimal design that is made ethically and sustainably and gives back to the community. As creators and consumers, our choices now have a global impact. This is why we consider how things are made to be important and this to be part of our responsibility as a business and global citizen. As a designer and jeweler, I only work with suppliers that share this view. This is why we make all of my pieces using only recycled gold and silver, ethically sourced and fairtrade stones, chains and findings that are made in the USA and Italy, and packaging and marketing materials made using recycled paper and clothing.

Niki is a GIA Graduate Jeweler. She was awarded the 2016 Halstead Grant Award and 2014 Windgate Fellowship Award by the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design. She has exhibited in galleries throughout the United States and Europe and her work can be seen in the pages of Glamour UK, Basic, Evening Standard, National Jeweler, and more. To see her one of a kind art pieces and CV check out nikigrandics.com

Enji is about modern, minimal design that is made ethically and sustainably and gives back to the community. As a designer and jeweler, I only work with suppliers that share this view. We make all of my pieces using only recycled gold and silver, ethically sourced and fair mined stones, chains and findings that are made in the USA and Italy, and packaging and marketing materials made using recycled paper.

As a member of Ethical Metalsmiths, we hope to be among the first movers bringing transparency and sustainable practices into the luxury fashion jewelry world. Ethical Metalsmiths and Fairmined gold and gems.  All our pieces are made in our studio in San Diego and we use low-impact, environmentally conscious studio practices to lessen our footprint. 

We take steps toward positive change in our industry by practicing ethical sourcing and manufacturing, because it’s important. To us, to you, to the women and men who mined the stones we use to create our pieces. We also donate a portion of each sale to organizations that help empower women locally and globally and work to end domestic violence and human trafficking because that’s part of the future we want to see.

Ethical sustainable jewelry fairtrade fair trade fair-trade jewelry recycled gold recycled sterling silver San Diego Carlsbad ethical gemstones ethically sourced sustainable

Save Money and Reduce Your Waste

Niki Grandics

With so many natural disasters recently it is almost undeniable that climate change is real. Many people, especially those who hold power in government, deny the fact that our world is changing and that eventually, our own way of life will have to change as well. However, power doesn’t lie in a single government or even a single person. California has already made plastic bags illegal to reduce waste and help aid in the fight against climate change. But helping in the fight against climate change and reducing waste does not have to be hard if you are willing to take initiative and here are some of our suggestions.

 

Packaging

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Packaging is one of the main contributors of waste, greenhouse emissions, and your biggest expense. You do not need to be a mathematician to know that 1 pound of tomatoes is cheaper than 1 can of tomato sauce. That is generally the rule when it comes to processed vs packaged food. Yes, it is easier to buy packaged food, but you also must think about its disposal.

Take for example corn and canned vegetables. I can always find corn for about $1 for 4 ears of corn in my local market but corn and canned fruit containing about 16 ounces (vegetables and juices) for about $1.50. With the whole ears of corn, you can use the husks and silk in a compost and virtually have no waste. The canned vegetables will have to be drained of their preservatives and their cans disposed of. You can decide to recycle, but you also must think of the emissions produced by breaking down the aluminum and melting it into a new product.

The same thing goes for all packaging. Most of our food consists of plastics and metals that need to be broken down and disposed of. Both their creation and disposal release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere that is not required in whole foods.

 

Reusable containers

Besides the use of packages, another big waste is the use of plastic bags and disposable container to store food and drinks. Not only at home but at restaurants and fast food places. In general, you should try to limit eating out as if it can get expensive and unhealthy.

But if a certain occasion does come up, try to take leftovers home in your own containers. Most restaurants are happy to allow this, and Starbucks and other coffee shops encourage bringing your own reusable cup. Store home leftovers in reusable containers and encourage everyone in the house to have a reusable water bottle.

There are also stores who have emerged as no waste stores, who only sell items in bulk and allow their own customers to bring in their own containers from home. Seek these out as an alternative to regular grocery stores. In general bulk items are cheaper.

 

Repair Don’t Throw Away

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I have a friend whose mother works in house cleaning and the stuff that people will throw away is insane. Brand new stand mixers, rice cookers, juicers, and slow cookers. All these large appliances and some unused clothes were thrown out because they had small defects and the owners wanted new items. She had a stand mixer, fully functioning, with a slight crack in the mixing bowl and a rice cooker/ vegetable steamer with a slightly melted button.

I also taught another friend that super glue is a valuable resource, fixing most things instantaneously. She had accidentally dropped and broke her eyeglasses. I saved her over $100 on a new frame simply by using super glue. I encourage everyone to find ways to fix things instead of throwing them away. Google and YouTube have many DIYs and tutorials on how to fix simple things**.

**ENJI highly encourages you NOT to try and fix electronics and high voltage items. DON’T fix your own electronics. SEEK professional help when fixing potentially dangerous items.

 

Sources:

https://www.keeperofthehome.org/29-ways-to-reduce-waste-in-your-home-and-save-money-while-youre-at-it

https://www.rethinkrecycling.com/residents/reduce/top-10-ways-reduce-waste

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/reduce-home-waste_us_57912d0be4b0fc06ec5c4b56

https://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/37-ways-to-reduce-trash