Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

What is The Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Blog

I’m Niki, the founder and designer of Enji Studio Jewelry. We’re a sustainable luxury jewelry brand based in beautiful north county San Diego.

at Enji we’re on a mission to bring you meaningful, modern, ethical design that shows off your style, honors the journey of your life, and reflects your values. We craft each piece for you in our Carlsbad studio bringing new life to recycled gold and silver and using only FairTrade and ethically sourced diamonds and gemstones.

Enji was founded in 2014. We take steps toward positive change in our industry by practicing ethical sourcing and manufacturing and giving back to the local and global community. We create our pieces for everyday wear.

Enji is about modern, minimal design that is made ethically and sustainably and gives back to the community. As creators and consumers, our choices now have a global impact. This is why we consider how things are made to be important and this to be part of our responsibility as a business and global citizen. As a designer and jeweler, I only work with suppliers that share this view. This is why we make all of my pieces using only recycled gold and silver, ethically sourced and fairtrade stones, chains and findings that are made in the USA and Italy, and packaging and marketing materials made using recycled paper and clothing.

Niki is a GIA Graduate Jeweler. She was awarded the 2016 Halstead Grant Award and 2014 Windgate Fellowship Award by the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design. She has exhibited in galleries throughout the United States and Europe and her work can be seen in the pages of Glamour UK, Basic, Evening Standard, National Jeweler, and more. To see her one of a kind art pieces and CV check out nikigrandics.com

Enji is about modern, minimal design that is made ethically and sustainably and gives back to the community. As a designer and jeweler, I only work with suppliers that share this view. We make all of my pieces using only recycled gold and silver, ethically sourced and fair mined stones, chains and findings that are made in the USA and Italy, and packaging and marketing materials made using recycled paper.

As a member of Ethical Metalsmiths, we hope to be among the first movers bringing transparency and sustainable practices into the luxury fashion jewelry world. Ethical Metalsmiths and Fairmined gold and gems.  All our pieces are made in our studio in San Diego and we use low-impact, environmentally conscious studio practices to lessen our footprint. 

We take steps toward positive change in our industry by practicing ethical sourcing and manufacturing, because it’s important. To us, to you, to the women and men who mined the stones we use to create our pieces. We also donate a portion of each sale to organizations that help empower women locally and globally and work to end domestic violence and human trafficking because that’s part of the future we want to see.

Ethical sustainable jewelry fairtrade fair trade fair-trade jewelry recycled gold recycled sterling silver San Diego Carlsbad ethical gemstones ethically sourced sustainable

What is The Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Hilda Chang

1-min (1).png

We have recently been posting many blogs about sustainability in your home and how to improve your impact on the earth. Although we all know that going green is a better for the environment, it can be easy to start doubting whether your hard work and dedication is going to improving anything. The truth is that although it may not feel like it, you are helping tremendously. One example of how you are helping is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is exactly what it sounds like. A giant island of garbage in the Pacific Ocean. Well… it isn’t exactly an island, more like a soup consisting of small microscopic plastics and trash that get stuck the middle of the oceans. This video can give you a sense of what we are talking about.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a combination of both the western garbage patch from Japan and the eastern garbage patch between Hawaii and California. The two patches converge above Hawaii and gets trapped in a vortex. Due to the rotation of the earth, sea, and wind directions, a single water bottle from San Diego can make it all the way to Japan and then end up in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. From there all non-biodegradable trash, such as plastic, gets worn down and broken apart to microscopic levels and makes the water look cloudy. It is estimated that 70% of all marine debris will end up on the ocean floor as well.

2-min (2).png

But the shocking part is that all this trash comes from two main sources. The first source is from the land where it is estimated that 80% of all pollution of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch comes from both America and Asia. 20% of the garbage comes from ships and oil platforms. This means that the western part of America is directly responsible for decades worth of trash, especially since California is the 4th largest producer of trash in America with 35 tons of trash each year. Now, cleaning it up is more of a challenge than initially perceived.

The problem lies in the growing patch. National Geographic said “during a 2014 expedition, Moore and his team used aerial drones, to assess from above the extent of the trash below. The drones determined that there is 100 times more plastic by weight than previously measured. The team also discovered more permanent plastic features, or islands, over 15 meters (50 feet) in length,” this means that the rate of growth for the patch is far superior to what we can currently clean. Not only is it continuously growing, but one of the main concerns of scientists is to keep marine life safe during clean up.

It has been a great concern for the marine life of the area as all current cleaning efforts will result in animals such as dolphins and fish getting trapped in nets and cleaning equipment. Although there is currently no mass cleaning effort, scientists agree that the safest and easiest way to clean up the garbage patch is through eliminating plastics and switching to biodegradable products. To give you a sense of just how much of an impact this would have we can look at our lifestyles as Americans. Each American produces the average of 4.4 pounds of trash per day, and is higher than the global average of 2.6 pounds. This might not seem like much but during a year a single person would produce 1,606 pounds of trash. Salon.com tried to put this into perspective by producing this infographic.

3-min (2).png

So, if you still think you are not making a difference, remember that you eliminate 4.4 pounds of trash for every day that you live sustainably. Imagine how much power a single community would have if everyone pitched in and tried to limit waste. San Diego is fortunate enough to be in a transitioning phase to a zero-waste city by 2040. This would help ensure the reduction of the waste significantly and aid in the cleanup efforts. Enji encourages each one of you to try and reduce your disposable consumption, especially plastics. Make a pledge to our sea friends that you will use more biodegradable products instead of plastics. Our previous generations might have made a mistake, but it is now our time to learn from them.

 

Sources:

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/great-pacific-garbage-patch/

http://garbagepatch.net/greatpacificoceangarbagepatchfacts/

https://www.treehugger.com/environmental-policy/trash-numbers-startling-statistics-about-americans-and-their-garbage.html

https://www.salon.com/2016/07/15/america_is_a_wasteland_the_u_s_produces_a_shocking_amount_of_garbage_partner/